She has a Master's degree in Biotechnology and is interested in integrating into the high-tech sector
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She holds a Master's Degree in Biotechnology and is interested in integrating into the high-tech field


SilverName

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Peace,

In about six months I will be completing a master's degree in biotechnology. I was always interested in computers, and during my degree I did a C ++ programming course and I really liked it. 

I know that there is not much work in the field of biology in Israel, so I thought of moving to the high-tech field.

I am considering a language programming course - JAVA, .NET or C # (according to allJobs, these are the languages ​​on the highest demand.) If there are recommendations for other languages, I will be happy to hear, and also which languages ​​are best to learn. I read about courses at various companies - Hacker Yu and John Bryce - that offer work to those who finish their programming courses (and I read another thread here on the forum that it's not really that way ...).

In the ideal I would like to be a computer programmer, but I am aware of the fact that the gaming market in Israel is not big.

In about six months I will have to take an important step that will determine a lot of my future, and I have a lot of questions on the subject. In a nutshell:

What is the preferred track (apart from doing an additional bachelor's degree) in order to become a programmer in a high-tech company?

Does the fact that I already have an academic degree (in an area that is not relevant to programming) will allow me to find work after a course in a specific programming language?

Is there a way in which I can combine my degrees in biotechnology with high-tech in order to find a good-paying job that includes both fields?

Are there junior programming jobs that I can get into without any experience, to get some work experience and improve my chances of finding work after school?

And any other relevant advice and advice is welcome :)

 

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It seems to me illogical to drop all of your academic record and go into a completely different field where the advance is in a disadvantageous position compared to the rest of the market. Why not follow the path of biotechnology?

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Do not listen to them.

You do not know Bio so well , But a title certainly opens doors. You can find a job as a program with a degree.

There are but a few points ...

 

First off you may not have enough practical experience in programming. Then you may need to work as QA in the beginning, in which case it is recommended that you make projects in your spare time to practice your programming skills and also have a demo for the next job.

Making a game in your spare time can improve your programming abilities a lot and this game is always a good demo that is very visual.

 

Second point, again I do not know the degree to the end but sure there are jobs that it will be a huge advantage. There are all kinds of programming jobs and if you can find a medical or bioproductive company looking for programming, then your biomedical degree will be a huge advantage.

You may be reduced to a lack of practical knowledge (it may not bother them to learn to program as part of the job), but that's a point you can easily speak up on your own.

Someone who knows how to program and also has knowledge in another field that is not directly related to programming is someone with a competitive advantage. 

A program that does not have something unique and knows how to do what everyone knows will be less relevant in the market over time.

The big "problem" with programming is that you always have to learn, you always have to develop, you always have to practice. Especially in the beginning, and mostly in your spare time because at work you will not have enough practical experience to move on to the next jobs.

 

So you're in good shape to have a degree. A degree is the first obstacle and without a degree (even if it is not in programming) your options will always be limited.

Well done.

Editing: I noticed that this is a Master's degree so you can definitely find a position in programming once you've closed a small gap in practical experience.

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Quote of MiniMizer

It seems to me illogical to drop all of your academic record and go into a completely different field where the advance is in a disadvantageous position compared to the rest of the market. Why not follow the path of biotechnology?

I would try to incorporate the knowledge you already have in biology with the acquisition of programming capability.

Something in the field of bioinformatics, mirror and introductory course

http://webcourse.cs.technion.ac.il/236523

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  • 3 weeks later ...

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