Advice from forum members regarding Computer Science Studies - Page 2 - Study and Job Suggestions - HWzone Forums
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Advice from the forum members regarding computer science studies


Yaniv 51

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There is a stigma (which may have been true before 10 years) that college graduates are less talented than university graduates. Excuse me, but today it's not true. Fools can be found in any academic department. There are no students who want to work in school but do not want to work as waiters? What would you say about brilliant students with an 99 average who chose a college student? People should stop giving prejudice play a major role in choosing an academic institution. Anyone who comes from high school or a psychometer with an 760 score, for health, should go to the Technion. The bottom line is that those who choose to study and invest themselves in academia will achieve their goals. Paper today plays less of a role in hiring. Good luck to all the undecided.

You have a serious problem understanding how this world behaves.

The most basic thing I can tell you is that if you compare the days of recruitment at the colleges (the number of companies and the number of days) compared with a university, you will find that companies are making a greater effort to recruit students and graduates from institutions with higher admission requirements.

The stigma that you are talking about, exists and probably correct today, stems from the assumption of an employer that if something makes a "discount" for himself that he studies instead of less considered with less accepting thresholds - he is less competent or takes a job Affordable.

You can disagree, but a "brilliant" student with an average 99 who went to college although he was accepted into a reputable institution shows everyone who reads his score sheet (even if it is not true) that studies were not his primary concern, otherwise he would go to the most considered place also If it is more difficult.

"Tail to the lions before the foxes," you know?

Who thinks that the place where the certificate came from has no meaning, can ask interviewers and employees of manpower companies and the name, which is sometimes more important than the score.

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You can disagree, but a "brilliant" student with an average 99 who went to college although he was accepted into a reputable institution shows everyone who reads his score sheet (even if it is not true) that studies were not his primary concern, otherwise he would go to the most considered place also If it is more difficult.

"Tail to the lions before the foxes," you know?

I can say that without further information, I would prefer a college student with 95 + than a university with 80-85. There is a greater chance of finding brilliant ones among them. From experience.

Placement companies and interviewers who rule out the threshold just because a college appears or draw conclusions like what you wrote about a person with a college 99 average are retarded. There is also a lack of normality.

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1. No one has addressed - are you sure you want to learn computer science at all? Before you make the effort, check that the profession is right for you. It is a very problematic profession, hard hours, high wages on the one hand, but the length of a career is very short.

2. There is no doubt (and anyone who says otherwise simply does not tell the truth) that there is a preference in the workplace for university graduates together for college graduates. This is the situation today.

3. What is more important in the initial filters is experience. As a college graduate if you come up with zero experience your situation is difficult. You must find a job in the field while studying. For a university graduate it will be easier.

4. The route of the open is an excellent route, but it is hard to rant. Not because the level is high, but because you need maximum self-discipline to succeed there. On the other hand, companies value their degree more than a college degree, and the awareness that most people who have studied in the open have done it while working, and that is also indicative of something.

5. The colleges are getting better over the years, if you start studying next year, you'll end up with 2017 .... Who knows what will happen until then.

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1. No one has addressed - are you sure you want to learn computer science at all? Before you make the effort, check that the profession is right for you. It is a very problematic profession, hard hours, high wages on the one hand, but the length of a career is very short.

2. There is no doubt (and anyone who says otherwise simply does not tell the truth) that there is a preference in the workplace for university graduates together for college graduates. This is the situation today.

3. What is more important in the initial filters is experience. As a college graduate if you come up with zero experience your situation is difficult. You must find a job in the field while studying. For a university graduate it will be easier.

4. The route of the open is an excellent route, but it is hard to rant. Not because the level is high, but because you need maximum self-discipline to succeed there. On the other hand, companies value their degree more than a college degree, and the awareness that most people who have studied in the open have done it while working, and that is also indicative of something.

5. The colleges are getting better over the years, if you start studying next year, you'll end up with 2017 .... Who knows what will happen until then.

First thank you so much that you really relate to my questions and not quarrels about what's better, not that I asked in the discussion.

I am aware that university is better, but I have accepted the fact that in the coming year I will not be accepted there and I do not think it is worthwhile to postpone the studies for another year.

1. So I pointed out that this was the direction - but I also asked what would you do with your degree? I imagine the work will be primarily in front of a computer - but the question of how it really works? Teams? Every man for himself? Because it's very important to me in my workplace that I have an environment with enough people.

2. known. Taking "risk" like thousands more young people.

3. After I start the degree (if and when), we will definitely try to get some work experience.

4. I do not think most of the time in the direction of the Open, I'm a person like many others need a slightly more orderly frame.

So I would be happy to go back to my original questions, what will you do with the degree and is it really worthwhile to go to IDC and pay more 3?

There's nothing to do, not all geniuses who take out 680 on the first psychometric exam, I tore my ass up and learned properly, I bet in the verbal chapter and I fell.

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You ask an irrelevant question. You can work alone, in a group, in a company, independently, in Israel, abroad, in development, testing, sites, mobile applications, servers, image processing, real time, It's probably not the time to decide how your work will look.

What is important is the principle shared by almost everyone, a lot of work, a lot of money relative to other professions, and a career that is caused relatively early.

In contrast to other scientific fields, the world of computer science and especially the field of development renews every 3-5 years beyond recognition, and therefore requires the employee to constantly study and experience does not always have value (at least not always clear value to the employer).

If you like it, go for it. If you just want your salary .. not sure that this is the right choice.

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At the beginning of the discussion I can only advise one thing.

You will learn where you think you should learn.

I can tell you from my experience that it's better to wait and take a few steps back for what you want.

I can give you my story, and there are quite a few people like me.

I finished my first year in mechanical engineering at Tel Aviv University.

Two weeks before the second year I decided to go with what I felt throughout the year and retire to go to computer science.

I did a psychometric test again and this week I received a positive response from Ben-Gurion.

I believe that everyone should learn where he sees himself learning.

I saw myself continuing to study at university, I could have started college this year, but I preferred to wait and take a few steps back for it.

People who want to learn Do both 4 and 5 psychometric and do not give up.

In the end, a year is nothing, and if you plan it right you will even get a lot out of it.

I think you'll start reading books in English and Hebrew. Your quantitative score is completely round to your first psyche.

You can improve and get accepted to university if that's really what you want.

If you go to college it's okay, and there's a very good chance that you'll be doing well and the question of whether you'll be whole with it and you will not feel missed.

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If you already college then go to HIT.

Even close to you, even reasonable tuition fees and there is no great advantage to IDC in a profession such as computer science (IDC is also prominent in other professions).

In total, HIT is known as a fairly good college compared to many other colleges.

I would like to add that there is indeed a significant difference between college graduates and university graduates.

As a college graduate you are likely to find yourself in a Sisyphean position and you may work as a contract worker (not a great pleasure)

As a reasonable graduate you will find yourself at the forefront of development with a salary accordingly.

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In the end, a year is nothing, and if you plan it right you will even get a lot out of it.

I think you'll start reading books in English and Hebrew. Your quantitative score is completely round to your first psyche.

You can improve and get accepted to university if that's really what you want.

If you go to college it's okay, and there's a very good chance that you'll be doing well and the question of whether you'll be whole with it and you will not feel missed.

First of all thank you for your response.

I only blame myself for not being willing to do another psychometric test, I had a few opportunities to start learning to take the test but I rejected it.

As far as I'm concerned, I will not feel missed. If I do not study at the university, I'm sure there are also college graduates who succeed (some of them not less than university graduates).

I would like to add that there is indeed a significant difference between college graduates and university graduates.

As a college graduate you are likely to find yourself in a Sisyphean position and you may work as a contract worker (not a great pleasure)

As a reasonable graduate you will find yourself at the forefront of development with a salary accordingly.

The question is whether this year that I "waste" is not better to start learning, gain experience in some position and then develop in another direction?

Because in the coming year there is no chance that I will have experience in the field.

I can take the risk of not finding a job in the field fast, I have enough patience to find a job, a relatively good financial background (you can always go back to the family business), and maybe some contacts (a family in high-tech, friends with a degree in the army) ).

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Let me correct myself. In the field of computer science, the gap between university graduates and college graduates in many cases will not be very special (depending on the industry in which you work and the company you will be accepted to)

I suggest that you take all the data you have, consult your relatives (parents), consider what is best for you to make a decision and a page behind it.

Successfully :)

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I will add a little to the discussion,

I have two close family members who work (as engineers, each in his field) at Intel Kiryat Gat for a few years (ie, they already interview themselves), and they say that it is very, very difficult to arrive For an interview with a college diploma. I do not know if the specific case is indicative of the rule, but I can imagine a situation in which high-tech companies are in demand (Intel, Etc.) make an initial screening by an academic institution, sounds logical and perfectly legitimate, just like screening psychometric exams for admission to a school.

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It is clear that college graduates will find it harder to get to job interviews.

Some people in this discussion are not clear.

I can testify for myself about the advantage of a well-known institution. When I went to interviews at Intel my average score was not very high (less than 77) and yet I received an invitation for interviews and passed them successfully (and I work Today).

It is unlikely that college students would have received similar treatment with such grades.

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