Advice from forum members regarding Computer Science Studies - Page 3 - Study and Job Suggestions - HWzone Forums
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Advice from the forum members regarding computer science studies


Yaniv 51

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Well then here's something I have to tell you about. In similar subjects, such as electrical engineering, there is such an interest, and university graduates will always prefer Bukharim to colleges, and there are reasons for this. As a student who studies at the college and sees content from the Technion and Tel Aviv University, there is no doubt that their complexity is greater and the demands are greater ... But you understand how many ideas people have in mind? You have realized that almost everything is software based ... You will have a lot of work in the field and because if you do not have a problem to travel to work a few years abroad the sky is the limit. Do not let it affect you, someone who finishes a degree in computer science. Your honor is in place, and after you do a year you will understand exactly why. And the very fact that you will have such a broad background in computers will do its part. This is the future man. So working in development you'll find another 10 years, what's the big deal. By the way do not forget that once you have this knowledge in mind you can always invent your own. Things that you have not even thought of until today will start to occupy you every day and there is no limit to what you can do and develop yourself. have fun!!!

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  • 3 weeks later ...
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Okay, after consulting at 2 educational institutions, I realized I was sure I was interested in this profession.

What is left to choose is only where to study (another year).

A. HIT - Advantages - University salary

B. College of Management - Advantages - From what I saw in the study programs, the study program seems quite interesting (offers a number of specialization courses in the third year), to the best of my knowledge the equipment is new, excellent ratio of lecturers / secretaries, disadvantages - high tuition fees. They offered me a scholarship for excellence that lowers my salary to 21 a year.

third. Tel Aviv University - Advantages - I have been through online reviews, and I have not found a single negative criticism of the institution, while in Internet searches I have seen that among colleges there is a high percentage of students in the field.

D. I can not agree to pay 40 a thousand a year so I'm not sure I want to look for good things in it ...

Your advice on choosing a school?

I am sure that in this post-title gap I can work as a junior in the junior position, from there to accumulate experience, after which I am not sure how critical the institution I will be, but rather what I am Know practical.

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HIT or Tel-Aviv Academic College.

I would love to have a little detail ...

Today I checked out details with the academic staff. First of all, the conditions there are higher than the rest. Most of the lecturers are from Tel Aviv University, so it seems to me that the level there is quite high.

Tuesday I have a consultation meeting and I plan to close it this week ...

- - - Unified response: - - -

HIT or Tel-Aviv Academic College.

I would love to have a little detail ...

Today I checked out details with the academic staff. First of all, the conditions there are higher than the rest. Most of the lecturers are from Tel Aviv University, so it seems to me that the level there is quite high.

Tuesday I have a consultation meeting and I plan to close it this week ...

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So I signed up to study in both of them, wait for answers and then decide what to do.

In the meantime, I noticed another profession that winked at me, and this is the management of information systems that I have in academia (and in terms of admission terms I am suitable), the job seems quite interesting to me, but I have no idea what its demand is in the market. Can vary). Can someone shed some light on the subject?

Is there any way forward from such a role?

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You have to understand that there is a difference between a degree in information systems management and the role of information systems manager. In particular, no one will take you to conduct any information system after you have completed a three-year degree in the field of college (also not university).

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You have to understand that there is a difference between a degree in information systems management and the role of information systems manager. In particular, no one will take you to conduct any information system after you have completed a three-year degree in the field of college (also not university).

So what is it? What is the starting point of such a degree?

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It's a good question I do not think anyone can give you a precise answer to. In general, there is almost no connection between the academic degree and the work actually done after the degree, not the content (perhaps you will use one percent of what you learned) and not by name. An electrical engineer can find a job as an RTL programmer, or as a validation person (any type) or as a chip engineer or in a thousand other positions. An industrial engineer and management can find a job as an ITP man, as a programmer, as a DBA, etc.

Company X needs to fill a position Y whose requirements are Z - these three variables are different between company and company, and the same engineer who finished the degree can do three completely different things in three different positions that all on paper are "electrical engineer" roles.

In any case, one thing is certain - if in the name of your title there is somewhere the word "management" - you sure will not engage in management. Managers come from a great deal of experience in the field they are dealing with, not from academic courses.

So when you're done, the starting point for the title you just mentioned is the job you'll find after you finish it. Open a job board and look for jobs that you think are relevant to the field of information systems. If you succeed in getting one after finishing your degree - you've found your starting point.

But you also have to look at things in a realistic way - high-tech companies do not queue up and grab every fresh college graduate they find, and I know quite a few college graduates (Braude and HIT for that matter) who found it hard to find work after graduation. Time and the conditions offered are significantly less favorable than university graduates).

In order to get a little scale, yesterday, a ceremony was held for the graduates of the PD cycle at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, which brings together 1,800 engineers in these fields. The Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, Ben-Gurion University, Haifa and Bar-Ilan, and in fact, every college graduate in a similar track is already inferior to the thousands of university graduates who go to the market each year, and there are also many colleges.

What I'm trying to say is that you can not guarantee the precise profession you will work on based on the degree you are doing, and the less you are focused on (the management of information systems is one of the most general), the greater the distribution of professions in the market.

In addition, try to direct as much as possible when you choose a school. This will greatly facilitate you later on.

Edit: Someone here mentioned And Google on the previous page. In general, these two companies do not recruit college graduates. Why, if there are so many talented university graduates in the fields they need (Intel is mainly hardware and software, Is it just software)?

The only rule in this field (at least in Intel) is engineers who require a limited number of specific positions.

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Intel recently began recruiting students from Hadassah College in Jerusalem, so I know for certain that they are starting to go a little too far from the universities.

Google does not recruit students / graduates at all, but only experienced and graduate students. In such cases it is less important if you are finished in college or university.

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There is no "starting to deviate" here. For years, students have been recruited from colleges. It simply changes from department to department. There is no general policy at Intel regarding college recruitment.

It is true that there is no policy, but in practice the Haifa development center has a surplus of students from the Technion / Haifa University and Kiryat Gat has Ben Gurion University.

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Intel tends to recruit a lot of students while they are students and at some stage, if appropriate, transfer their successful ones to full-time positions. I know quite a few people who started out as college students and moved to full-time positions (because after a year or two at a student job they already know if you're good or not and it does not matter to anyone where you learned).

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There are such cases, that's true, but it's not something a college graduate can build on.

If you segment students at Intel by a school, you will see that the percentage of students from the Technion is significantly higher than their share of the total student population in the North in the relevant faculties.

There is no point in trying to present things as if Refers equally to college graduates and Technion graduates, because this is simply not the case.

True, there are many groups at Intel, but it does not change the big picture.

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