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Determined to be admitted to Tel Aviv University


SharonX

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Engineers and man-machine systems. In Israel, usually information systems. That you have a lack of knowledge about why this "engineering industry" does not make the discipline at least "real". I do agree that there are graduates of industrial engineering who are actually "upgraded officials." Not all of them are talented enough to engage in a more serious job, and there is too much supply of ATN engineers, because of the combination of these, this is the case.

However, to the same extent, there are many other engineers who are totally not engaged in the profession they have acquired. The connection that you create between a few - that "engineering" - is "real" and unemployment is quite vague. Software engineers are probably and certainly no more "real" than other engineers. Right now, it's easier for them to find a job - and find the best paid job.

There are certain areas that have no demand in Israel and such professionals simply will not have a job - it has nothing to do with how much this profession is "real" or not.

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And here is the second superfluous response of the week

No. I have no problem with accountants (some of my friends are accountants ... : rolleye0018:), Just in this case I have a prior knowledge of who I am responding to.

This is true. But I guess there's also the question of what happens at 50. I'm not sure then that the engineer's situation will necessarily be better.

Apparently, even at the age of 50 it is better to be an engineer with 20 years of experience than an accountant with 20 years of experience. I'll get back to you about this another 20 + year.

How exactly is it related to industrial engineering and management? What are you exactly an engineer? This is a general title that does not qualify for any specific field. This is why graduates spread between ERP systems and Java programming. In the first recession, half of those industrial and management engineers will go to sign in the office. Remember my words.

You again prove that on the Internet you can write a lot without understanding anything. What Electrical Engineer Engineer Exactly? electrical power? Half of them write RTL code and the other half make the code a schema. What Software Engineer and Engineer? He's only writing a code, is not he?

No engineering degree is used for any specific field - we do not live in 1800 engineers who were connecting gears. Every engineering degree is general. Of course each degree is different because each imparts qualifications in a particular field, but a fresh electrical engineering graduate does not know how to build a processor and a graduate in mechanical engineering do not know to build an engine.

If you ever bothered to look at the engineering degree syllabus, you would find that an electrical engineer (Hardcore Engineering, you say) is studying - beyond mathematics and physics - topics such as circuits, signals and waves. Beside them, he learns Computers, algorithms, graphics, databases, etc.

In fact, according to your method, it is possible to say that electrical engineering is a general term that does not suit any specific field, and that is why the graduates spread between writing code and validation of electrical circuits (and this is only from the people who work in my building). High-tech).

You should not warn me about the first recession. In the past decade there have already been two, and the distribution of the signatories in the bureau is more or less uniform. No one (at least in high-tech) is immune from layoffs. Most of those fired will probably be from professions with more people - if a high-tech company closes a project or a division, then those who go home are 100, software engineers, 50 electrical engineers, 10 engineers, and 2 accountants.

But again, you talk without understanding how industry works and what engineers do, so your contribution to this discussion is negative.

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Apparently, even at the age of 50 it is better to be an engineer with 20 years of experience than an accountant with 20 years of experience. I'll get back to you about this another 20 + year.

I'm also an industrial engineer (though not from the Technion) - yes, I will probably know it by myself, although until then I hope to be in Canada or Australia, but that is something else.

I think that professions such as an attorney or an accountant have an advantage in that the field is changing at a very slow pace and an accountant can disappear from the world to 10 for years to come back and simply continue his work. In certain engineering fields, if you do not run very quickly, you may find yourself out of the race, and as far as I can see, there are a lot of electronics engineers whose field of specialization has passed away and found themselves without work.

Either way, given that my registration date for the forum is 2002 - the chance that we will be here even while 20 year is probably not so bad. ;-)

But again, you talk without understanding how industry works and what engineers do, so your contribution to this discussion is negative.

Unfortunately, we are talking about a lack of comprehensive understanding of the population - including academics (from colleges or colleges).

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sexual

You may have prior knowledge of the heart, but not the wages in the area of ​​accounting.

He talked about wages at the age of 30. At this age, an accountant certainly earns less (not to mention the two years in which you earn a starvation salary), as I said, there is a chance that in the future it will be balanced and maybe reverse (and perhaps not, there is not really data).

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Professionals gain a little bit at the beginning of their careers. Their situation improves significantly with the accumulation of experience and specialization. High-tech workers start at a high salary, encounter a glass ceiling about the gross 20-25 a month and at the age of 40 show them the door out.

As for Minnie-he has no prior knowledge of me. Not how I look, not where I work, not what customers I have and certainly not how much I earn.

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sexual

You may have prior knowledge of the heart, but not the wages in the area of ​​accounting.

I have a friend who works in the field today, and my girlfriend worked for many years at PwC, so I know quite well the salary levels in Israel for Senor / Superfizer / Manager etc.

After four years of study, an industrial and management graduate will be able to find a first position in the high-tech industry, where he will earn a gross 15-16. After those four years, a graduate degree in accounting will have to do a two-year internship in which he will receive NIS 5,000 per month (also gross of course).

After the specialization gap of course is reduced, but still the order of magnitude 1.5-2 in favor of high-tech employee (I talk about base salary only, before weighting bonuses, shares, etc.). From here on, this gap is not significantly reduced and has remained constant over the years, thanks in large part to the fact that wages and benefits in high-tech rise with a much faster rate than accountants.

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Professionals gain a little bit at the beginning of their careers. Their situation improves significantly with the accumulation of experience and specialization. High-tech workers start at a high salary, encounter a glass ceiling about the gross 20-25 a month and at the age of 40 show them the door out.

Minimizer - This may be more true for Technion graduates. There are many graduates of industrial engineering and management who will reach this gross (15K) salary only after two or three years of experience (Including university graduates).

Heart - I do not know exactly what will or will not be at the age of 40. But also earning 5 - 10 a thousand shekels in the first five, ten, twenty years is something that definitely should not be canceled. Surely a person with a financial education like you should know that. Money is now money now.

By the way, the high-tech ceiling is really not 20 nor 25. Good software developers come to this wage after two or three years of experience.

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I have a friend who works in the field today, and my girlfriend worked for many years at PwC, so I know quite well the salary levels in Israel for Senor / Superfizer / Manager etc.

After four years of study, an industrial and management graduate will be able to find a first position in the high-tech industry, where he will earn a gross 15-16. After those four years, a graduate degree in accounting will have to do a two-year internship in which he will receive NIS 5,000 per month (also gross of course).

After the specialization gap of course is reduced, but still the order of magnitude 1.5-2 in favor of high-tech employee (I talk about base salary only, before weighting bonuses, shares, etc.). From here on, this gap is not significantly reduced and has remained constant over the years, thanks in large part to the fact that wages and benefits in high-tech rise with a much faster rate than accountants.

This gap not only shrinks, it also reverses after 5-6 years and only grows with time.

Also, I have a fairly broad perspective on the subject, I have a lot of CPA friends like myself and in the company where I work there are quite a few industrial and management engineers with a similar seniority who earn less than I do.

I do not work in high-tech, but industry and management is not a high-tech profession. What's more, I would probably have made more money in high-tech :(

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Get out of the gardens and bunkers you dug

That everyone learn what interests him / matches his abilities

In the end, income is a derivative of abilities and skills rather than education. It is enough to take a look at the resume of senior figures in the economy in order to discover that they come from a wide range of fields of study. (Some of whom even studied at the Faculty of Humanities)

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