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Project Management Course - Worth the Time and Money?


LimaC

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Hello everyone,

I am 22, a discharged soldier for several months now. My employment experience consists primarily of sales. In addition, I have worked on several projects in recent years, which included preparing business plans, building budgets, obtaining investors and the like. Unfortunately, the projects did not pass the test of results and remained as projects from which we can learn from them.

Last year I signed up forStudy I was asked to do a preparatory course in mathematics, and during the preparatory year I formulated a decision that was influenced by all sorts of factors, not to start my degree in the coming year (if at all).

At the same time, I started to find out about Study (JCE) and especially on Course Projects Management. The cost of the course is NIS 5600 (registration fee + the studies themselves) and is scheduled to continue for 4 months starting in October, in the format of one meeting per week 4-5 hours.

I've been through the material that's going to be delivered onCourse, I spoke with the lecturer of the course and with the relevant counselor. I realized that there was no need for experience as well as an academic degree in order to be acceptedCourse. On the one hand it is good that I meet the conditions of acceptance, on the other hand it causes uncertainty about the level of course and seriousness in which a potential employer / investor will relate to the certificate in the future.

(The certificate is awarded by the College of Engineering in cooperation with the Technion).

Some of the topics in the syllabus: - Organizational structures - Management control - PMBOK principles - Product life cycle cost - LCC project - and the list goes on ...

In terms of career, my biggest dream is "serial entrepreneurship", which includes building and integrating businesses and projects from the opening stages. A management position, however senior, as a slightly less attractive employee, does not drop off as a plan.

Based on the above, I would love to hear more about the course, the practical knowledge it provides, the seriousness with which it is taken, the possibilities it can open and, in general, whether it is equal.

Thank you very much, good evening.

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Not from the field, but I know someone who has completed this course or a similar course and he is a doctor in all his organs. I personally would have gotten away from it ..

In my opinion, if you already study then try to get accepted to the university (I dislike colleges). Of course, getting a degree becomes the norm does not mean that everyone must necessarily do one.

There are countless people who have succeeded and enriched themselves without a degree or even in the field of high-tech .. It all depends on aspirations and courage to try and realize

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You can find "unqualified" people in any field ... and the fact is, today in terms of dry conditions almost everyone can be accepted as an engineer (550 Psychometric, 80 math and English in four units).

The question is whether the course is worth the time and the money invested in it?

Today, there is no longer a significant difference between a university and a recognized college (and not some college that offers a degree that is bogus in contracting), especially since there are subjects taught in one institution and not vice versa.

There are countless people who have succeeded and enriched themselves without a degree or even in the field of high-tech .. It all depends on aspirations and courage to try and realize

Definitely agree with you.

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I work in academia, I have children from a family who interview high-tech.

There is a difference and a big difference.

In my department, they would not bother to take the exam for entrance to a master's degree.

My specific specialization is closed to college graduates and will probably remain closed in the coming years.

Regarding my family members, there are those who are being run by them in society. They would not invite college graduates and there were those who would invite everyone.

None of them (two in number) received a college graduate.

A rule rule says that if it is easy to get into it, it shows the overall level of quality of the people and probably it will be harder to find a job. Besides, be sure that every course / diploma / degree that includes the word "management" ensures that you * will * not work in management. Management positions do not take someone with a degree in management, but a management prank

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I think your understatement of the college system is out of proportion.

Remember, the psychometric criteria for acceptance into a particular class depends, inter alia, on supply and demand. The fact that the degree of engineering is longer and more difficult than the university counterpart (usually) has an adverse effect on the demand for it.

Once again, the college that forms the basis of this argument is a recognized and professional college, and not one that was opened to enable those who are willing to work physically hard (to finance their studies) and not intellectually ...

A rule rule says that if it is easy to get into it, it shows the overall level of quality of the people and probably it will be harder to find a job. Besides, be sure that every course / diploma / degree that includes the word "management" ensures that you * will * not work in management. Management positions do not take someone with a degree in management, but a management prank

Due to the low acceptance / availability conditions, the seriousness with which the certificate will be received by relevant parties (investors / partners / employers) is one of the most influential factors in the decision whether to register or not.

The main question is whether, in your opinion, the financial investment and time invested in such a course will be worth the enrichment, knowledge and impression that the certificate will provide?

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I do not think so.

I think that professional knowledge on the subject can certainly help to do a better job (and in total project management is more professional than academic), but will it make you enter such a job? They did a course like that and they do not plan on doing such a course.

We have passed a project management course in studies. The course, of course, focused on the more academic aspects of the field. The course only scratched this huge field.

In short, if you want to do a course like this for the teen, great. The contribution he will give you in order to be accepted into the first job is zero. The contribution that he will give you for a long time job is also negligible (because the engineering experience is the second most important). Important places (eg, HP) perform filtering based on skills. You are less interested in what courses you have passed, etc.

I am a graduate of Industrial Engineering and Management from Shenkar, by the way.

Symbore:

I agree with you about the management section, but some things you're missing:

1. A degree in Industrial Engineering (and Management) is not a degree in Management. There is an academic discipline called Industrial Engineering. Part The foundations of Disciplina are principles Scientific management.

2. There is a difference between "management" and being a manager (who deals In the administration). People can not make out. There are "simple" workers whose job deals with management processes. There are managers who rarely engage in management (but almost exclusively in management and what I call "noshashim").

Certain management processes can and should be managed in a scientific and "precise" manner. Sometimes, in order to do this, you need a lot of mathematical or statistical knowledge at all (at the level at which an undergraduate engineer with a BA can not perform).

Other processes are within the realm of "art" (not art) - and certainly have nothing to do with the title.

The discipline "project management" is not something that is art. No one will be good at it solely because it is "competent". Managing a high-level project is something you need to know and learn. For that matter, over years and years. Many things there require academic or engineering knowledge at the level of at least a bachelor's degree. Getting the authority of the PMI is very serious.

Regarding VS Colleges:

1. There are large, respectable companies that certainly employ college graduates. for example: , , SAP.

(And I know more than one example in each of these companies I also know more than ten)

This does not mean that there is no advantage for university graduates (and rightly so, they are better on average). It just means that college is not "shit".

2. I personally know two graduates from Ben Gurion who have worked with me for over a year (one is fired, one has resigned). They were both Fools. They also lacked professional knowledge, neither general education nor simply low intelligence (at least in relation to the average intelligibility of the software industry). So you also have to look at what degree the person completed at the university, not only if it is in the university.

3. It also depends, of course, on which college is involved. Din Shankar, interdisciplinary and academic Tel Aviv - Jaffa, is not the law of Afeka, Sha'arei Mishpat or Sami Shimon.

4. There is no doubt that the average number of university graduates is also not higher and also studied the material of the degree better. However, the variance, from my experience, is not so low and there are many "missed". In the end, employers rely on internal tools to measure and test the candidate.

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  • 3 weeks later ...
  • 5 weeks later ...
I work in academia, I have children from a family who interview high-tech.

There is a difference and a big difference.

In my department, they would not bother to take the exam for entrance to a master's degree.

My specific specialization is closed to college graduates and will probably remain closed in the coming years.

Regarding my family members, there are those who are being run by them in society. They would not invite college graduates and there were those who would invite everyone.

None of them (two in number) received a college graduate.

A rule rule says that if it is easy to get into it, it shows the overall level of quality of the people and probably it will be harder to find a job. Besides, be sure that every course / diploma / degree that includes the word "management" ensures that you * will * not work in management. Management positions do not take someone with a degree in management, but a management prank

I get a little off the thread.

You said you had a family that interviewed high-tech. I'd love to know what they think about the Open University if you have any idea.

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Great appreciation. Many begin at the Open University, with a few graduates, fewer with a high average. Learning at the beginning means something about self-discipline and the attempt to realize yourself. Of course, there is interest in the number of years. A man who makes an open road in ten years is not overly enthusiastic. If they come to me (I do not work in high-tech) two people, one from a regular university and one from the open, with the same average, from the open will gain a large plus, even if the average will be significantly lower than the average of the other.

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... If they come to me (I do not work in high-tech) two people, one from a regular university and one open, with the same average, from the open will gain a large plus, even if its average will be significantly lower than the average of the other.

A completely legitimate view - but this is not some "truth". There are also employers who will say the opposite.

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Obviously ... it's every employer and his personal preference. But I see in the field that there is a certain appreciation for the opening and there is also a rational basis behind it. The studies there are simply more difficult. I also do not see anyone preferring a college graduate on his face

. I have noticed and I do not know whether this is due to certain easements or because there are many more college people who simply have a grade inflation. Both DFPs and talented people come to us from colleges with average 90 plus, while those who finish the BA tracks finish I finished with an average of 90 (when in my main course, I finished with 92) and finished with the top ten (or close to it) and I see appreciation towards me, not at the level of a prodigy but there is some appreciation.

By the way, one of the reasons we do not get on our tracks, college owners. They can be people with brains but when you ask a college graduate who just finished: "In this course, you got 100, what are your insights?" And they can not answer you and then you keep asking him about the rest of the courses and there he barely knows how to answer

Everyone has the Zionist magic Hello. A hard course that you somehow managed to get out of 100 without understanding, but when you move with a college graduate, and the absolute majority can not write a sentence and a half on most courses they have learned, it shows us some trend

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Must agree with inflation and college grades. I'm a third year college with average 97 and I'm really not a genius, just know to sit on my ass. I do not want to make a negative post to the place where I study so I will not mention the name, but there are many students here who are intelligent but completely lacking in learning skills. Meaning that they will never open a book or rely on anything other than that summary presentation in a lecture they have been in. They see it when trying to talk to them about something that is not the next exercise to be submitted.

These students have averages of 80 +.

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