Interested in learning programming on .NET - Is it Acre or John Bryce? Studies and job offers - HWzone Forums
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Want to Learn .NET Programming - Is Acryo or John Bryce?


elellad

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The title pretty much says it all. I want to start learning programming in .NET environments and I wonder whether it's worth doing the course in Hacariu or John Bryce.

The Akirio is much closer to me so they are much more comfortable for me and their commitment to work (if not then a return of 5000) is also a great advantage.

Are there people here who did a place and could testify?

Would appreciate help,

Thanks.

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I do not really understand the reactions here. I do thank you for taking the time to share information, but why?

The fact that I mentioned the fact that "a commitment to work" is, of course, only a huge bonus. But if no one can really commit so there is nothing to do.

Still the big question I did not get an answer to is where should I learn?

The reason I mentioned the Akario big time is for convenience because they are a few minutes walk from my house.

If they are of a high standard and are well known, then it is already excellent for me. Whether or not there is a commitment to work.

For these things I would be happy to detail and explain.

Thanks in advance.

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Hi QttP, glad you commented.

In the big discussion I published on the "general" forum you certainly helped me when I published that I was lost :)

I want to be mainly a programmer and develop software. That's how big it is, and a good start, I realized it was developing a dot net. And then it will be much easier to learn alone other programming languages ​​like Java that are not much different from C # and so on.

I got a degree in computer science and realized that it was not for me and I was beginning to hear right and left that it was really, but really not required to be accepted into the high-tech industry as a programmer.

My background today as a programmer is nil. I am currently in the final stages of screening only in the Hacario field and considering whether to continue there for the full course or to move to another place and study fully. The programming world meanwhile fascinates me, as nothing in the computer environment has fascinated me to this day.

And I've been around computers in many areas since I remember myself starting to learn to walk.

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Hi QttP, glad you commented.

In the big discussion I published on the "general" forum you certainly helped me when I published that I was lost :)

I want to be mainly a programmer and develop software. That's how big it is, and a good start, I realized it was developing a dot net. And then it will be much easier to learn alone other programming languages ​​like Java that are not much different from C # and so on.

I got a degree in computer science and realized that it was not for me and I was beginning to hear right and left that it was really, but really not required to be accepted into the high-tech industry as a programmer.

My background today as a programmer is nil. I am currently in the final stages of screening only in the Hacario field and considering whether to continue there for the full course or to move to another place and study fully. The programming world meanwhile fascinates me, as nothing in the computer environment has fascinated me to this day.

And I've been around computers in many areas since I remember myself starting to learn to walk.

What exactly in the world of programming fascinates you? Have you ever written a code?

To sit 9-12 hours a day and write this code is not something that fits everyone.

I would suggest you as a start to start learning alone and see if you ever connect to it, and whether you like it.

There are no shortcuts in life, you want to be a software developer, you will do a degree. The chances of finding work after one course or another is very low, there are exceptions, but they are a very small percentage.

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What exactly in the world of programming fascinates you? Have you ever written a code?

To sit 9-12 hours a day and write this code is not something that fits everyone.

I would suggest you as a start to start learning alone and see if you ever connect to it, and whether you like it.

There are no shortcuts in life, you want to be a software developer, you will do a degree. The chances of finding work after one course or another is very low, there are exceptions, but they are a very small percentage.

It fascinates me to start writing code from scratch and to create software that works, runs, serves people, etc.

And you probably did not read my last paragraph you quoted, but I did write code, because like I said, I'm currently in the Hacario class and there I'm learning a basic introduction to see if someone is right or not.

And do not understand why they repeat the section of the title every time. A degree in computer science combines a lot of math and lots of things beyond practical programming. Why should I do a degree in this field if my chances of succeeding are nil because I'm really bad at math?

Where did you hear that a very small percentage succeed after a course? So why is there a big demand for these courses?

I understood the opposite - precisely in the course you learn a higher level of programming.

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You will want to be a high level programmer and know how to write codes properly and efficiently No escape from math is like you say I want to build a building but I can only make a plaster .... then you will make a great plaster but an entire building will not build in life ... You'll learn how it's full of teatics again :) )

I have no background in programming or anything but I know people who are studying computer science and practical sophistication

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It fascinates me to start writing code from scratch and to create software that works, runs, serves people, etc.

And you probably did not read my last paragraph you quoted, but I did write code, because like I said, I'm currently in the Hacario class and there I'm learning a basic introduction to see if someone is right or not.

And do not understand why they repeat the section of the title every time. A degree in computer science combines a lot of math and lots of things beyond practical programming. Why should I do a degree in this field if my chances of succeeding are nil because I'm really bad at math?

Where did you hear that a very small percentage succeed after a course? So why is there a big demand for these courses?

I understood the opposite - precisely in the course you learn a higher level of programming.

To be a good programmer to know a programming language is not all, you need to know data structure, algorithms, logic, design patterns, object-oriented programming, and so on.

Now for the sake of demand, it's all a matter of marketing. Who would not want to learn a few months and then get a salary of 15 + a thousand shekels a month? Trying to sell you a dream.

Most companies did not even invite you to an interview after you finished the course, there's nothing to do, most of them prefer university graduates.

I'm not saying you will not be able to find a job, I'm just saying that it will be very, very difficult to find it (under normal salary terms), if at all.

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Yes, I remembered your discussion now. I will not repeat general things that were said there about the courses, because you certainly remember (and if not, read that discussion again).

It seems that at least the direction of the decision has been positive. :)

As for your dilemma at the moment - my opinion is simple. In general - it does not matter where you do the course.

All this assumes that there are no significant differences between the content studied (as reflected in the syllabus), and there are no significant differences in prices. If there are such differences, it is your responsibility to clarify them.

So, if this is the dilemma - you simply have a place that is more convenient for you in terms of location, hours, etc. Because the more convenient and accessible it is for you - the easier it will be for you to learn and the more effective your studies will be.

Why do I think it does not matter?

A) that the material is ultimately the same material. All of this can be learned independently from accessible sources. The meaning of the course here is the existence of an organized framework for study, practice, and knowledge testing, and this I believe every course can provide.

B) Even if there are certain differences, they will usually be dwarfed by the student's ability, investment, and motivation.

C) In any case, you will not be able to obtain truly reliable information about the quality of the courses from asking people who have experienced. Because you will not find someone who did the same course in the same starting conditions, and that too. The only way to get some kind of estimate is to find any statistics about the course graduates. Not sure someone did such research.

Somewhere it seems to me that you have reached a stage where the statements mostly stop you. Because you are afraid to make a "mistake" (choosing a course that is not optimal), you simply do nothing, and so you do not progress.

Neither your career nor your life will fall for it if you did a course in John Bryce or Hacker-Yu.

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Yes, I remembered your discussion now. I will not repeat general things that were said there about the courses, because you certainly remember (and if not, read that discussion again).

It seems that at least the direction of the decision has been positive. :)

As for your dilemma at the moment - my opinion is simple. In general - it does not matter where you do the course.

All this assumes that there are no significant differences between the content studied (as reflected in the syllabus), and there are no significant differences in prices. If there are such differences, it is your responsibility to clarify them.

So, if this is the dilemma - you simply have a place that is more convenient for you in terms of location, hours, etc. Because the more convenient and accessible it is for you - the easier it will be for you to learn and the more effective your studies will be.

Why do I think it does not matter?

A) that the material is ultimately the same material. All of this can be learned independently from accessible sources. The meaning of the course here is the existence of an organized framework for study, practice, and knowledge testing, and this I believe every course can provide.

B) Even if there are certain differences, they will usually be dwarfed by the student's ability, investment, and motivation.

C) In any case, you will not be able to obtain truly reliable information about the quality of the courses from asking people who have experienced. Because you will not find someone who did the same course in the same starting conditions, and that too. The only way to get some kind of estimate is to find any statistics about the course graduates. Not sure someone did such research.

Somewhere it seems to me that you have reached a stage where the statements mostly stop you. Because you are afraid to make a "mistake" (choosing a course that is not optimal), you simply do nothing, and so you do not progress.

Neither your career nor your life will fall for it if you did a course in John Bryce or Hacker-Yu.

Many thanks for the help and responses. It's hard to explain in words how important it is to me.

And I understand and agree as many have told me that it does not really matter too much the specific place as long as most of them are the same,

But is it still meaningless to tell the employer if I have done the specific course through John Bryce or Hacker-Yu?

And if already freesoul23 raised the subject of mathematics, is it really mandatory and important? Will they really not look at me as a graduate course compared to a graduate?

I've had to plow the Internet and most of the requirements for C # developers, whether it's in the DotNet environment or not, 95% of the cases did not ask for a degree, did not even put it up. We did not even mention it as an advantage.

Only a very single percentage (perhaps even less than 5) actually demanded a degree or noted it as an advantage.

From what I've talked to a lot of people, most say they do not care. And what is important is to see whether the person is good or not, look at his portfolio and see what he is capable of.

I'm interested in hearing your opinion on this QttP topic.

Again, thank you all!

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And I understand and agree as many have told me that it does not really matter too much the specific place as long as most of them are the same,

But is it still meaningless to tell the employer if I have done the specific course through John Bryce or Hacker-Yu?

And if already freesoul23 raised the subject of mathematics, is it really mandatory and important? Will they really not look at me as a graduate course compared to a graduate?

Look. To think and to question and ask questions, even until the end of the soul - is fine.

But to ask again the same questions that have already been answered many times, only in the hope that you might get a different answer? I'm sorry, I do not understand what the point is.

I already told you and I said others And more than once - No one will look at you as a graduate course compared to a graduate degree.

Say again, just to make it clear?

No one will look at you as a graduate course compared to a graduate.

No one will look at you as a graduate course compared to a graduate.

No one will look at you as a graduate course compared to a graduate.

I will not go back to what, it's understandable (say, among other things, in your previous discussion).

I've had to plow the Internet and most of the requirements for C # developers, whether it's in the DotNet environment or not, 95% of the cases did not ask for a degree, did not even put it up. We did not even mention it as an advantage.

Only a very single percentage (perhaps even less than 5) actually demanded a degree or noted it as an advantage.

The question is, what were you looking for?

Jobs for freelancers on specific projects? Where no one cares about anything, for them you can have a yeast cake, as long as you know to give the solution they are looking for.

Jobs for experienced developers? After a certain number of years of experience, the degree really does not matter. However, some employers (especially large, organized companies) will not take an employee to work without a degree. Just like that. And of course, the key question - how do you get ahead of the same experience?

From what I've talked to a lot of people, most say they do not care. And what is important is to see whether the person is good or not, look at his portfolio and see what he is capable of.

Pretty. You said - portfolio. You said - see what he's capable of. So you first have to have a portfolio that will see what you can do. Do not assume that at the end of the hacker-yo / John Bryce course you will have a portfolio like this.

And if and when you do, then if your employer does not care about academic education at all, why would he care if you did your first or second course?

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Yes I understand. It's not that I really repeated that question again.

Where did I look? No matter where and regardless of who, without exception, a very small percentage actually asked for a degree in Computer Science / Software Engineering or noted it as an advantage. The vast majority did not mention it and asked for experience.

And as I said in the first sentence, I understand and it is clear to me that being a graduate is an advantage over a graduate of a course. The thing is, I do not want to be looked at as a graduate.

I am willing to make a small salary adjustment because of the "inferiority" I have as a graduate of a course, and then after 3 + years that I will have advanced experience and will be a significant advantage compared to any graduate degree, to begin to really climb the level in terms of position and salary.

And the key question is really how do I get experience if everyone without exception require experience?

My aim was to do the course in Hakar-Yu that "you commit" (real or not ... do not know) to work, and at least I have the first entrance. I know that in the first year or two the salary will be low and I will be a junior key, but after two years I imagine I can go into other companies or even a higher ranking in the company I first entered, which will give me a higher position and a higher salary.

And that's why I want to be a programmer and that's it. I do not care about the surroundings of computer science. And beyond that, I am aware that I will not be able to successfully pass Computer Science because my mathematics is a very weak side.

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The reason these courses are so popular is that there are enough people who buy the illusions that the institutes are selling. Now, you can definitely find a job without a degree if you acquired the knowledge and skills alone and over time and it even says more about such a person than an academic degree. However, this was the first time that the course was the first time it was involved in the field, and this required special resources. In fact, all the material is available for free on the Internet, not very impressive, and there is such a large supply of graduates who do not really want to take The risk. How do you compare people who studied for years or did a bachelor's degree versus someone who spent some money on a year-long course?

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