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To compromise or go to college?


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Elhan, I am currently debating about the profession I want to study and I wanted to hear but do you think it is worthwhile to continue. 

I am currently studying in Ben Gurion's Engineering Preparatory School and in the meantime my grades are good, but the psychometric is a little less.  

I would very much like to study computer science / software engineering and in the current situation even if I get 100 in the preparatory course I will not be able to meet the admission requirements.

On the other hand, all the other professions that are in the nature of "lite programming" (information systems, communication, etc ..) are open to me and I can be accepted into them.  

How to proceed from here? Compromise on studies that interest me less? 

The truth is that I think of colleges as an option as well, I do not want to postpone my studies for another year to improve my psychometric, I feel that all the benefit I received in the preparatory course will be harmed because I will probably forget most of the material until the beginning of my studies. 

I am currently trying to improve my psychometric while preparing for the preparatory course, but I am not building on that because the preparatory course is already busy. 

 what do you think? Would you compromise or go to college? 

 

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It is never advisable to learn something that you do not like because you are going to engage in it only ... all your life.

 

On the other hand, sometimes you think you love something and then find that it really is not what you thought it would be. (Therefore, it is recommended to check in advance before registering !! And this includes going to an open day, taking an interest in the curriculum, etc.)

 

Therefore, the answer is not unequivocal and is quite individual.

 

If the decision were mine, I would "compromise" and remain at the university. And not because I have something against academia, on the contrary, but because the "lite" you are describing may surprise the good and reveal something really nice and interesting.

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If you choose to learn what you do not want at university or whatever you want at college I would choose college unequivocally. That what you do not want can surprise is another story, it's true for any profession you learn.

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Quote of none77

That what you do not want can surprise is another story, it's true for any profession you learn.

 

That's right, so you should find out a little before you make a decision, and do not jump right on the lighter and more obvious option that is college.

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Will you stop talking nonsense? His face has a limited number of options that he should review before he listens to your amazing advice. So stop confusing your mind and keep your cynicism in check for other people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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If you have already invested in the preparatory program, I would recommend that you choose an engineering track from those that are open to you. Information systems are very promising.

This is especially true if you think you can be accepted after psychometric improvement next year. Because there is a great overlap in first year studies if you get accepted to the school these studies will be recognized.

 

 

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I was also in the preparatory program at Ben-Gurion University.

I study communication systems engineering (second year), I can tell you that the emphasis in the degree is mainly software (80% of the graduates also go to work in software and not hardware), the emphasis is of course on communication but I would not say that you study "lite programming" if you look at The courses you can see that there is a lot in common between software and communication systems (just an example of programming languages ​​I have used in the meantime in courses - Java, C / C ++, Assembly. Add to this theoretical courses in data structure software, algorithms, etc.).

 

I suggest that you check out the courses given in the department and not just the general description of what each department does.

In terms of post-degree work, I know that the degree is equivalent when you apply for jobs that require software engineers and in jobs that deal with the media has a very big advantage ...

 

Do not think I'm telling you to give up on software engineering, I just suggest you check out all the options well.

Also suggests you think well before you turn to the option of a college because no matter what, most of the market looks less well on college graduates (especially those with averages below 80 ...).

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Quote of lev-xnumx

The market looks at experience. If you study at the college you can find a job as a student position in your situation will be significantly better than any university graduate without experience.

 

Even if it were true (and it is not), his chances of finding a student job while in school are significantly lower than the chances of someone attending university.

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In all professions the market is looking more and more at experience and less on formal education. The model of higher education will begin to change in the coming decade and the trend has already begun in the computer professions.

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There are cases where this is true and there are those that are not. For a first job after graduation this is unequivocally true. There is almost nothing a college graduate can do (including gaining relevant experience during his studies, etc.) that will put him in a better position than a university graduate (Technion / Tel Aviv / Ben Gurion / Hebrew) without experience, unless he is a lift with years of experience in development. Software, which is definitely not the case here.

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You claim that a college student who worked during the course of two to three days a week in the field will be in a position inferior to a university graduate who did not work day in the profession? Perhaps the biggest companies will prefer a university graduate without experience over a college graduate with experience because they do not care that he shaves at their expense for a year or two, but in medium or small companies will prefer someone with experience who will begin to generate money for the organization from day one.

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Quote of lev-xnumx

Perhaps the biggest companies will prefer a university graduate without experience over a college graduate with experience because they do not care that he shaves at their expense for a year or two, but in medium or small companies will prefer someone with experience who will begin to generate money for the organization from day one.

My personal experience is thatis also The large companies will sometimes prefer a college graduate with relevant experience than a university graduate without experience. All the more so if it was someone who worked for them as a student.

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