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Study Counseling - I would love to help you


maor18
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Peace be upon you.

Currently I am a student as a software engineer. I am considering developing beyond my field of study so I am here to consult. I will say beforehand, I am weak in math and would rather look for something that does not include heavy math in it. What am I looking for? Anything related to working in front of a computer. In the future, I consider myself working in front of a computer, whether it's developing software or working on certain software that requires some kind of knowledge. Also technical support related to broader areas of computer. In short, anything about a computer I would love to deal with in the future. Again, my only problem is math so there are subjects I can't afford to go to (such as computer science, software engineering, etc.). I will be glad to help and advise you.

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I did not understand what the problem is, as you say you do not like math and therefore you will not be able to study computer science software or any other engineering, but you want to work in programming, so what is the problem with the track you are currently on? Sounds like you've come to the right place, in my opinion it is better for you to become strong in math and study computer science, but that is your choice.

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Quote of Moon-Mage

I did not understand what the problem is, as you say you do not like math and therefore you will not be able to study computer science software or any other engineering, but you want to work in programming, so what is the problem with the track you are currently on? Sounds like you've come to the right place, in my opinion it is better for you to become strong in math and study computer science, but that is your choice.

I said no programming required. I am currently a software engineer. Soon it will be a freshman year, but among us who would want to take an engineer when there are loads of engineers in the market?

That's why I want to go beyond what I'm doing right now, the problem I don't know what. Obviously not required programming, I do know that I want something related to computers. I don't have the next step in my mind of knowing what I want. I came here to hear recommendations

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Do you just want to sit in front of a computer screen? Is that your requirement? What is something about computers?
If you want to work in software you must have a relevant background like service at 8200 or some certificate at least for the first job.
If you want to work hardware then go to IT or some computer shop to be a technician.

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Quote of Moon-Mage

Do you just want to sit in front of a computer screen? Is that your requirement? What is something about computers?
If you want to work in software you must have a relevant background like service at 8200 or some certificate at least for the first job.
If you want to work hardware then go to IT or some computer shop to be a technician.

I came here to consult on study topics. I'm not familiar with the degree market (whether it's information systems and the like).

My sense that you came here to preach morality, if that is your goal then there is no point in responding. If I misunderstood, then you now have a more in-depth explanation of why I am seeking counseling.

I want to know the world more

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You say you want to work with computers and I still don't understand what you mean, what interests you? Do you want to program? Do you want to test software? What exactly do you want to do in the future.
And for what you said, "Who wants an engineer to have engineers" has a very great demand for engineers too, because there's a lot of programming that doesn't need a degree and engineers can pay less.

Edited By Moon-Mage
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Quote of Moon-Mage

You say you want to work with computers and I still don't understand what you mean, what interests you? Do you want to program? Do you want to test software? What exactly do you want to do in the future.
And for what you said, "Who wants an engineer to have engineers" has a very great demand for engineers too, because there's a lot of programming that doesn't need a degree and engineers can pay less.

So that's it, I have no idea. 

I know I want to work on a computer, don't know what. 

Software Development? Software Testing? Data checking on computer, running data. This world is big and I'm less proficient at it all. That's why I want to hear about degrees that don't require heavy math and still the main occupation is computer - so I can understand more and get to know more professions I don't know so I can research.

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Quote of napoleon45

If you don't have the math thing, which is the basis (justified or not, it's another thing already)

For any computing topic, you might consider design / tri-software studies, things more humane

And not a realistic profession.

why?

I'll tell you why I came to consult.

I heard from my environment talk about information systems. These information systems are not engineering degrees which means that the math in them is lower than in engineering (at least I guess so).

So, I said I wanted to look into degrees related to computing and technology (again, I think I exaggerated a bit with the computer thing, but I'm basically talking about all gadgets (if it's development) For example) and all the technology that goes on from day to day).

I want to know degrees that come from topics that interest me. 

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I tried to give a different / different direction and still in front of a computer.

It is best to contact a counselor at the institution you are studying at.

He knows you and also knows the demands of areas

That interest you.

 

Successfully !

Edited By napoleon45
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Quote of maor18

I said no programming required. I am currently a software engineer. Soon it will be a freshman year, but among us who would want to take an engineer when there are loads of engineers in the market?

You will be surprised but a lot, it is true that most of the high salaries are received from DM / Software Engineers, but there is a demand in the market for both engineers and graduates with their respective salaries.

I do not agree with the attitude of someone who was not a prodigy and programmer already at the foolish age of ten, or did service in a unit compatible with his profession that he will not enter the market as a determination, I know 40-year-olds who started programming from 0, who are very well placed in excellent companies. 

 

For that matter, I have a few friends who studied programming at John Bryce from 0 and got a first job offer of 13.

True not everyone is like that but it should not take the wind out of your wings.

 

As is generally known, the curriculum is divided into levels:

Course / Certificate

Practical Engineer 

Bachelor \ Engineer

 

If you're doing well in freshman year I wouldn't recommend you take any course, why get down to grading?

You will integrate into the market as an engineer, while working on mathematical ability and, if you see fit, complete your degree.

 

 

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No-One Quote

You will be surprised but a lot, it is true that most of the high salaries are received from DM / Software Engineers, but there is a demand in the market for both engineers and graduates with their respective salaries.

I do not agree with the attitude of someone who was not a prodigy and programmer already at the foolish age of ten, or did service in a unit compatible with his profession that he will not enter the market as a determination, I know 40-year-olds who started programming from 0, who are very well placed in excellent companies. 

 

For that matter, I have a few friends who studied programming at John Bryce from 0 and got a first job offer of 13.

True not everyone is like that but it should not take the wind out of your wings.

 

As is generally known, the curriculum is divided into levels:

Course / Certificate

Practical Engineer 

Bachelor \ Engineer

 

If you're doing well in freshman year I wouldn't recommend you take any course, why get down to grading?

You will integrate into the market as an engineer, while working on mathematical ability and, if you see fit, complete your degree.

 

 

I probably didn't make myself clear. My intention is not to give up on the engineer and start something on the spot, but to think about the post-engineer if everything goes well.

Obviously there are examples of crazy successes as engineers and not only (such as John Bryce) but like success examples there are also fall examples. 

Quote of napoleon45

In the specific case of the current institution, fewer are familiar. 

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Quote of maor18

In the specific case of the current institution, fewer are familiar. 

The consultants have no problem reviewing your educational situation and finding out what is going on with you.

And at the meeting you will also have the opportunity to raise and respond exactly as they propose.

A. They know much better about the requirements of other professions.

B. No problem getting to know you and your better and lesser abilities.

This does not mean that you will necessarily love what you are offered, but at least professionally

That's what suits you.

Want to, heed my advice.

Do not want ? Read nothing.

Again, good luck!

 

Edited By napoleon45
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No-One Quote

Are you on a two or three year program?

two years. Soon (if the corona allows) is supposed to finish first year.

The plan is to try to finish the semester best and see the year in (which should be a lot harder) and so know the direction.

Software engineers also have math, so still try to give myself what is possible. 

However, I still want to try to get to know the field of study at a much higher and more serious level. 

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