Conversion to High Tech - Studies and Job Offers - HWzone Forums
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Conversion to high tech


law89
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Hi friend

 

I have been considering a high-tech conversion at one of the bootcamps for a very long time.

 

1. Is it recommended for someone who has crossed the 30s?

2. Is it true that in the age group 40-45 there is starting to be a serious problem finding a job?

3. What can someone who has been fired from the industry because of age and worked as a programmer work for?

4. How many working hours usually work in the field? (I saw a lot of those who recorded 8-9 hours and I saw some who recorded that they also work after they return home)

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1. Depends on you personally. No one will stop you from doing a career change, but there is a price to be paid in starting your career at the age of 30 versus 20.

2. Depends on what field. Startups are probably not looking for people at this age and on the other hand places like the aerospace industry are the age of origin.

3. In programming.

4. Just like in the previous questions, depending on the workplace. In high-tech there is a pretty serious flexibility regarding work hours and also work outside the office and there are places where the “pen falls” at 17pm.

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thanks for the answers

 

1. So that's exactly what I'm asking. I understand that there is no small harm in starting at a late age, but is the damage big enough to make the situation worthless?

2. And what is the situation in companies in companies that are more in the middle? (Ordinary established companies that are not government companies)

3. lol but what happens to those who do not find a job in programming? Can he get to other jobs that are indirectly related like Data Analyst or is it lost to someone with no experience aged 40+?

 

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The field of finance.

 

I understand that this is probably not my direction in all respects (interest, wages, working hours, employment options that are mainly in the Tel Aviv area).

 

I was looking for a field with a good salary so I decided on the direction. I learned a little Python. If the next question is if I liked it, then the answer is that it is not amazing but on the other hand in my field I have suffered quite a bit in terms of interest.

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You probably already understand that if you are interested in the profession just for the sake of money, it will not work. Need a real love for the profession.

Do what you love as a job. It is much better for health.

 

I'm not sure that's 100% true.

 

At first my profession was not bad. It is very difficult to separate exactly the triggers that cause a person to leave the profession but I believe the combination of:

Poor starting salary (minimum order of magnitude)

Travel that takes several hours a day

Inconvenient hours - sometimes many hours a day (can reach 12+ +) and sometimes you have to change your entire schedule because there is something to do with work and it is in the evening.

 

Basically all life in such a situation revolves around work for a salary that is not worth it.

 

If you ask me if I would prefer the same conditions but in the area I like facing a job with more comfortable hours and a better salary that will allow me to both live better and free time for the things I love, I will probably go for the second option because in the first option you do not have the time And not the money to do things you love (and as much as you love a profession, it's still a job and it's not the same as engaging in a hobby that you do not have to engage in).

 

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Quote of multicore

You probably already understand that if you are interested in the profession just for the sake of money, it will not work. Need a real love for the profession.

Do what you love as a job. It is much better for health.

 

I just want to sharpen something. There is an area I have volunteered in the past.

I decided to check in depth working in the same field. I consulted with someone who transferred me to someone else who runs the field. I tried to contact her and schedule an appointment to hear more details in depth. To my delight, she agreed to meet. Basically this is an area where I may be able to work without an additional degree / certificate but not sure (depending on where I want to work, etc.). If I had to issue a certificate, it would probably take two years.

 

In terms of hours, the hours are not so convenient. Many times they finish work at seven in the evening.

In terms of salary - I realized that for a start I might be able to find a part-time job and I would probably have to work in two places and not sure I would be able to get a full time job (assuming I could find two places that would not overlap in hours).

In short it is not certain that I will be able to reach even the minimum wage. If I find a full-time job I may be able to get more except.

The supply of jobs is very small and there is no expected job in my city in the near future.

 

What those I spoke to told me, is that on the one hand the hours are uncomfortable if you have children and on the other hand it is impossible to have a family with such a salary.

 

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Depends on which startup and which role. Experts in important fields with an understanding of depth and breadth will be coveted at any age.

 

Hey.

Thanks for the investment. I saw the post a day or two ago. I want to answer it neatly because there are some very important things here in what you record.

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Depends on which startup and which role. Experts in important fields with an understanding of depth and breadth will be coveted at any age.

 

First, thank you very much for your answer. You raised great points here. I will start answering :)

 

What if I work medium and not a specialist? (I find it hard to believe that I can close gaps of years and more of the best)

 

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What damage do you mean? I can think of two things - it is clear that someone who starts working at 30 will accumulate less seniority and less money and less pension than someone who starts at 20, but the relevant question here is of course the comparison to other areas. Let’s say you start at age 30 with a 20K salary, while someone who started at age 20 will be the same age as you already with a 30K salary and a respectable accrual. It is true that he has an advantage over you, but if your personal alternative is another job where you will continue to earn (say) 15K - then where is the damage? There is of course a matter of stability. If you are in a place of tenure, then even with lower wages, it can have long-term benefits.

 

The matter of stability. If I were to continue with 15 until retirement in high tech, it's not bad at all. If you are thrown at a certain age and go down to a salary of 5-6-7 that you have to move to another area this is a problem.

 

a quote

You probably already understand that if you are interested in the profession just for the sake of money, it will not work. Need a real love for the profession.

Do what you love as a job. It is much better for health.

a quote

And that, in the end, is the right advice.

 

 

Do not see an area where I come with a real love for the profession. Assuming I love watching basketball, that does not mean I love coaching and in the few areas I really love, that's about to be the case. Moving from something you love to “consume” to something you provide the product you consume does not necessarily mean you will love what you do.

Therefore, I will be content with a profession that I will not hate.

 

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It has nothing to do with the profession, but with the specific workplace you work in versus the place where you live. Tens of thousands of high-tech people exist in the exact same reality. A matter of choice, priorities and willingness to invest to be based in a place that may be more appropriate.

 

In this case it is related to the profession. In what is supposed to be my "main occupation" there are not many jobs in the first years and their distribution is very limited. So this is the minimum travel I will probably need. In high tech, if I'm lucky, I can find a job close to home.

 

As for the choice, it is almost non-existent, that is, if you want to earn say 15,000 you have to do overtime (there are places that pay the overtime).

In high-tech, it's your choice.

 

I'm interested to hear your opinion on the conversions of Acquire or Infiniti. Overall, it seems that the company there finds work (at least during the internship period).

What bothers me a lot is that they teach Java or the c / c ++ language, which I made clear are relatively old languages ​​and it is better to learn JavaScript or Python.

I am committed to two years working through them. Does this close my career path to a very specific field after which I will not be able to program in newer languages ​​(do not know what can be done with Java, with the second option I realized that it is mostly embedded systems)

 

 

I will note that I got to check out areas related to the degree I studied.

Banking - If I'm lucky I can find a relative close to home. According to a friend who works at the bank, the base is about 6-7 thousand NIS which is quite poor. Also poor raises, an order of magnitude of 3-4% from such a low base. In addition, I realized that this is a very stressful job. You are a kind of sales agent and need to For some destinations, but unlike a sales agent who gets commissions here you do not get.

 

Data Analyst - I have been looking for a job close to home for a long time. is nothing. I'm not sure about the salary. I have a sample that is too small. Indeed, the requirements are usually in the sky: SQL, BI tools (dips, etc.), Python / R, Excel, VBA and more

 

Work for an insurance company - on the face of jobs that I saw as low salaries. Even raises are usually low. Again, here too my sample is small. I talked to 3-4 people who work / worked in the field.

 

 

I do not think I like one of these jobs, so my preference is for a job with comfortable hours and a nice salary even if I do not like the job (assuming I do not hate it) because even in my field I do not see much love for options that exist.

 

 

If there is anyone here who works as an analyst or data analyst, I would be happy if he could give his second cent on the profession.

 

I will also note that I started studying Python on the assumption that it could help in both finance and high tech. It's less boring to me than what I'd been doing but it's hard for me to project on what would happen if I worked on it day after day.

 

 

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I understand you to a great extent and can definitely identify with

Quote by law89

Do not see an area where I come with a real love for the profession. Assuming I love watching basketball, that does not mean I love coaching and in the few areas I really love, that's about to be the case. Moving from something you love to “consume” to something you provide the product you consume does not necessarily mean you will love what you do.

There are just people with a crazy drive for something, and there are some without. I'm the other type (as you say) and somehow manage in the meantime. :) I do not wake up in the morning with thoughts of revolutionary technology, do not deal with it all day and do not go to sleep and dream about it at night. So (among other things) I did not win and I will not get to invent something crazy that will change the world and make me a billionaire.

 

But Drive is not something binary. And I will testify to myself that even though I do not have a super-drive, I still have a little, and I also have a love for the profession. For me it is expressed in the fact that I like to solve problems. I like to take a system, learn it, understand the requirements from it, and how to implement them / improve the system. I definitely feel satisfied when I took something with a bug / glitch and was able to resolve it, or when someone asked to consult with me about something and gave him good advice, which solved his problem. I enjoy identifying things that are missing / not working well enough, and adding / correcting what needs to be done. I enjoy working with people, brainstorming together and coming up with solutions.

 

Do you think you like / will love such things? Find out how you imagine your work in the world The software?

Quote by law89

What if I work medium and not a specialist? (I find it hard to believe that I can close gaps of years and more of the best)

There is no simple answer here. Let’s just say - in startups you won’t find mediocre people over time - they just can’t afford it. In organized societies - medium / large - I have seen people who are just mediocre and stay both years and until a very old age. Yeah Al that sounds pretty crap to me, Looks like BT aint for me either. Maybe they had a benefit of a kind I did not recognize, or they were just good enough to do specific gray tasks.

 

Just what's the problem with being like that? That it's a risk. If something happens and yet you find yourself out there - with a lot of seniority, experience that seems significant on paper, but thcls - do not know much and have not learned much (because you have engaged in some particularly unimportant field that does not require Skills), so suddenly you may have a problem finding a job, especially if the mind is no longer flexible enough to learn new things.

 

So - even if you think you can not be a "star" developer or an architect with excellent lateral understanding, you should still be good at something. Maybe project management, maybe people management, maybe working with clients, understanding their needs and how to mediate between them and the engineers. This way you can preserve your value over time.

 

  

Quote by law89

I'm interested to hear your opinion on the conversions of Acquire or Infiniti. Overall, it seems that the company there finds work (at least during the internship period).

What bothers me a lot is that they teach Java or the c / c ++ language, which I made clear are relatively old languages ​​and it is better to learn JavaScript or Python.

I do not have too much opinion, not about these specific places, because I do not know them. Also know someone who studied in "Rock" and conversations with her - the practical material they teach is quite impressive. It is possible to leave such places with knowledge and abilities that will allow you to develop quite well later, but because this is not an academic degree, it is difficult to find a first job, and you depend on them quite a bit to provide you with the initial placement and opportunity. From what I know, for example, in this period of the corona and the uncertainty - the graduates there are not really kidnapped (on the other hand maybe even fresh university graduates suffer from the same problem, do not know).

 

I also know that these places teach not only ++ C / C and JAVA, but also other languages ​​and new technologies from the world of WEB and the world of UI and the world of graphics. Precisely diversity is not lacking. Looking at the age of language as a characteristic of its value in the market is not universally correct. The question is whether it is used in industry, and both C, + + C and JAVA are still widely used (and this is not going to change anytime soon), simply in different areas from the areas where Python / JAVASCRIPT or something else is used.

Edited By QttP
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Hey

 

Thanks for the response. I will answer a little briefly (you will soon understand why) and in the coming days I will answer in more detail.

 

I can say this:

In high school I hated math

After high school, I improved my grades and suddenly I started to see some beauty in some of the subjects

I can say that I was missing the area of ​​problem solving. I'm learning a little Python, and suddenly there was some riddle that made me think after a very long time and I enjoyed it, but I can not throw it to work in the field because I do not know what it's actually.

Maybe a certain dose of "puzzles" will do me good but a larger amount will make me "flooded" and feel like it's too much.

I used to say I would like as many puzzles as possible, today my view is a little different. My work greatly eroded me.

 

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I also know that these places teach not only ++ C / C and JAVA, but also other languages ​​and new technologies from the world of WEB and the world of UI

 

And this is why I respond quickly and partially:

I've had a lot of hesitation lately. I decided to try to approach the test in the express and see if I pass and then look further. I left details and in the meantime did not get back to me, it will probably be tomorrow.

 

From what I understand in the past it is mostly c, c ++ and java, but I will check with them.

 

In my field, once you enter a particular niche, moving to another niche is accompanied by no small economic price.

What happens if I want to go through after two years a commitment I have to program in Python or JavaScript? Is it possible?

Is my salary likely to drop?

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In my opinion, you are too much "dividing a bear's skin before being hunted" and think a little too much "what if" before you even start studying in an orderly fashion and before you have thoroughly researched what the studies include.

 

Most people specialize in one area or another, not in one language or another. Even within the same field different languages ​​are sometimes used, and the languages ​​are also not limited to a single field.

 

Do not build on a high salary during the period you are working "through them", nor do you build that within two years you will become so professional that you can obtain a significantly higher salary in the field in which you worked in relation to another field. After two years you are still not far from a fresh adult, and what they will look for in job interviews is mostly thinking and learning ability. So the chance that your salary in the first job after the commitment will be significantly lower than the salary during the commitment / trial period seems to me quite small.

 

In any case - the salary depends on a lot of parameters and varies from company to company even for similar positions. Not all scenarios can be predicted. Just make sure to be the best you can to increase the space of options open to you and Your bargaining.

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