Ben - Gurion University of the Negev - Software Engineering / Computer / Computer Science - Studies and Job Offers - HWzone Forums
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Ben-Gurion University - Software Engineering / Computer Science / Computer Science


ggg123

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Hello everyone, I wanted to present to you my dilemma.

I will be released in about a month and am considering enrolling in the 14. My psychometric exams are not excellent, but the matriculation exams are compensatory, and the engineering and quantitative agreement is enough for every field of engineering (and computer science) that I want, apart from the excellent programs that do not interest me.

The dilemma is about the field. Basically, I'm a person who really loves computers and connects to it. The thing is that I do not have previous knowledge in the field and I have never written a code of software and I do not know how I will deal or if I connect to the subject. I used to write code in HTML and I loved it, but I assume that software is another world.

I understood that there is a computer engineering course that actually combines electrical and electronic engineering with computer science and is a hybrid of both. In other words, the degree deals with both hardware and software and enables integration into industry in both fields.

To tell the truth, it sounds too good and I could not find too much of that title for graduates who graduated from college and employment opportunities.

How much is there really employment for a computer engineer? Hardware field developed in Israel? If I want to pursue my degree in software, will not I be at a disadvantage with a software engineering / computer science graduate?

My other question is about English. The grade I received in the English Psychometric exam is not good to say the least and puts me at the advanced level of 1. My level is much higher. My question is - let's say I signed up and was accepted with the current score. If I take the GM exam in July, which of the Zionists will decide to which level I will attend the university?

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As for the possibilities of work it is hard to say. It depends on many factors - title scores, your geographic location, market requirements, etc.

With regard to English, what you perceive is always the higher score, ie, if you have an X score in English in the Psychometric exam, you are fired from 2 courses in English from 4, and an Y score in the Master's degree exempts you from 3 courses. According to which you will be required to do courses in English.

In my opinion, most universities were given the option of postponing courses in English for the second year and perhaps even for a third year, and trying to issue a sufficient grade for exemption in the AMIR test.

In any case, it is not recommended to do a psychometric exam for this because there is a break between deadlines (not available at the Amir) and the price for the test is much cheaper (150 vs. 500 seems to me)

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There is so much "hanging" about the answer to your question that you simply can not answer.

All the degrees you have listed are good. With everyone you can find work relatively easily. Again, something is not absolute, but university graduates in these fields are the graduates who find it easier to find work in Israel today. There are more software jobs in the FS - but not all of them are "quality." In the hardware area, more jobs are "quality" (this is abstraction, but I think the idea has been moved).

Obviously, a person who has experience in software development has an advantage, but in the end you also do not (I think) have experience developing hardware. This is not really a consideration. That's why you do a degree.

Go to what you want, both titles are good.

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The question is what is going to be in 4-5 years. According to what I read from the reactions of graduates of electrical engineering (a degree equivalent to computer engineering), the labor market today is not brilliant. But this is electrical engineering.

I was unable to find responses from graduates of the degree of computer engineering.

On the other hand, as Ido said, it's easier to find work in software. The question is what is going to be in 4-5 years, and what will be the relevance of the title over time. According to what I read in all kinds of articles, which I can not point out, the chances are that there will be a decline in software development and an increase in hardware. This is also a consideration.

But above all, I have to choose what is most suitable for me personally, a degree that touches more software (software engineering) or a degree that touches more hardware (computer engineering).

I just can not say that. I am afraid to register as a computer engineering engineer, and during the course of my studies I discover that I do not even connect to the field at all.

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A. It is impossible to know what will be five years from now. Anyone who says otherwise is a liar and an idiot.

B. If you were to distinguish between a degree in literature and an engineering degree, I might agree that one of them is "more suitable for you." But there is no such thing described in software engineering "fits you" and is described in computer engineering (or vice versa). In the end, these are engineering titles that include similar disciplines.

Beyond that, you can enroll in any degree and find out that you are not connecting. You can also finish your degree and then find out while you are looking for a job.

You're getting too low resolutions here.

Both titles are good, you'll see what's coming back to you. There is not always a wise or absolutely correct consideration.

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People who study computer engineering at the Hebrew University, almost all of them without exception find student jobs in the field during the degree.

In Hebrew, the title is now called "Electrical and Computer Engineering". Type of integration of electrical engineering and computer science.

Definitely a very high quality but also hard and crazy.

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There is no justification to study software engineering at Ben Gurion instead of computer science. The department on the face and there is no practical difference from the perspective of the employers. Electrical engineering is the worst department in Ben-Gurion (from the attitude toward the student, the quality of teaching, etc.) and it is best to stay away unless you are really interested in working in the field.

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This is the first time that I hear that engineering departments at Ben-Gurion University are bad. I understood that they were considered to be of high quality and of high quality.

It surprises me to hear this.

Where did it come from? Is this information based?

- - - Unified response: - - -

People who study computer engineering at the Hebrew University, almost all of them without exception find student jobs in the field during the degree.

In Hebrew, the title is now called "Electrical and Computer Engineering". Type of integration of electrical engineering and computer science.

Definitely a very high quality but also hard and crazy.

Hardly even in comparison to a degree in software engineering or computer science?

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The level of studies in the electrical and software department at Ben Gurion is good. The problem is the learning experience, not the level. I studied in the electrical department and, relative to friends who studied in the departments of information systems, software and communications, I passed a kharekiri with a knife rather blunt on nothing, in fact, we all found jobs. I'm just saying you'll go into the electricity department only if you really are really really closed on work in the field.

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Harder than computer science. The syllabus is very similar, to add to this a course in physics and engineering.

And what about computer engineering versus software engineering? Here, too, is there a significant difference?

- - - Unified response: - - -

The level of studies in the electrical and software department at Ben Gurion is good. The problem is the learning experience, not the level. I studied in the electrical department and, relative to friends who studied in the departments of information systems, software and communications, I passed a kharekiri with a knife rather blunt on nothing, in fact, we all found jobs. I'm just saying you'll go into the electricity department only if you really are really really closed on work in the field.

Did you do a degree in computer engineering?

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No, but the difference between this track and electrical engineering in computer specialization is small. Computer and software engineering at Ben-Gurion University are two different worlds. The software concentrates on the software and the computers concentrate on the material aspect with minimal touches of the software.

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And what about computer engineering versus software engineering? Here, too, is there a significant difference?

Not personally familiar with the program of software engineering. From what I know, computer science is extended to 4 years with additions in physics (which give you nothing).

It's more a marketing title ("Hey, you'll be an engineer!") Than practical.

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No, but the difference between this track and electrical engineering in computer specialization is small. Computer and software engineering at Ben-Gurion University are two different worlds. The software concentrates on the software and the computers concentrate on the material aspect with minimal touches of the software.

On the open day they presented the degree as combining much more software than the track for electrical engineering.

Was asked - does a computer engineer who completes a degree at Ben Gurion receive the tools to integrate into the industry as a programmer?

And what can you tell beyond the title? The material is interesting? The quality of the lecturers? difficulty level?

- - - Unified response: - - -

Not personally familiar with the program of software engineering. From what I know, computer science is extended to 4 years with additions in physics (which give you nothing).

It's more a marketing title ("Hey, you'll be an engineer!") Than practical.

I actually understood that computer science is a title that places an emphasis mainly on mathematics, and less on the part of Software with an emphasis on software engineering.

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The level of difficulty is high. Most of the lecturers are bad and do not make an effort to improve. Most of the material in general is not relevant to actual work in the industry. In general this is a typical engineering-oriented academy. Whoever is good to him will say that it is interesting but most people find the study as difficult and long as you know what.

The difference between software engineering and computer science is typical bullshit academic. We sell you the same thing in two different names. In practice, the only difference is another year and a little difference in the courses. The real difference is not at all relevant to those who are not in the academy.

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