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computer engineering?


RoeeKa

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Hey friends,

I am currently a student after first year in computer science (starting second year in October)

I am currently considering continuing to study for a degree in computer engineering - I got to read about it a bit on the Internet and I realized that it is a combination of electricity + MDH.

Unfortunately I have never messed with electricity so I can not tell if I really like it, however it should be noted that I have experience in programming for a few years and I like to program but am looking for "some variety".

In addition, some of the people I spoke to said it was a waste because in the end the job market would be a programmer or an electrical engineer and not both, so you would supposedly not gain experience in one of the areas.

This decision extends my degree by a year,

Anyone did? Anyone know? What do you do with it then? What is the level of difficulty compared to computer science?

Thanks!

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I have a friend who did it (still does to be honest).

It's a very busy degree, and the load makes it difficult. You are exposed to a lot of different topics and areas, and by the end of the degree you will have very extensive knowledge, but you have to keep in mind that this is a long and tedious road.

There is truth in what you have been told - most of the works are either this or that and not a combination of the two. There is a chance that the background in electrical engineering will give you added value and a deeper understanding of many things as a software engineer, but to what extent this will be reflected in practice, it is difficult to extend. Not sure it's worth the extra year and the difficulty.

I would say it is only worthwhile if you have a lot of strength and patience for studies and are not burning for you to enter the job market quickly.

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A degree is not just the knowledge acquired, it is far beyond that. A degree is a signal to potential employers about a person's skills and abilities. A degree in software engineering certainly indicates its owner more than a degree in computer science, as it is more difficult, cluttered and longer.

2. Another significant advantage of a software engineer is that such an engineer will be able to choose his path. He could be an engineer and he could be a programmer. The degree opens up more options, new doors.

3. A third advantage, if also limited, is for people who want to specialize in the field of real time embedded. Ostensibly, any programmer can do that, but an engineer has a certain advantage in that he is really able to understand how the hardware works.

The downside: Harder and longer studies, which combine physics and engineering professions. Of course, the difficulty depends on the institution of study.

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It does not seem to me that you have come to the end of the guy's mind.

He talked about a degree in computer engineering, not software engineering.

I would be happy to clarify your intentions in "Can be an engineer and can be a programmer". You meant an engineer specifically hardware? Because a software engineer can also be with a three-year degree in computer science in college, and a building engineer you probably won’t be able to be anyway. :)

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Yes, I meant a hardware engineer of course. I referred in my answer to computer engineering (a combination of electrical engineering and computer science), if that's not what the discussion developer meant, maybe things are irrelevant to him and I'm sorry for the confusion.

Beyond that: the fact that there are people who have studied computer science for 3 years and call themselves "engineers" does not really make them engineers.

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Thanks for the comments :)

Indeed, I did not mean software engineering but computer engineering (which combines electrical engineering + computer science)

I am less interested in the matter of "looking at me as an engineer" but what do you do with it during your career, where do graduates in the field fit in? What do you do?

And yes, I'm a little put off by the fact that at the end of the day you probably only deal with one of the areas (can anyone verify that?)

I assumed that the degree is difficult, but how much more difficult is it than MDMA?

Has anyone here studied the above degree?

Unfortunately I can not find people I hired did the degree

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Apparently I was confused because I was referring to a degree that combines electrical engineering and computer science. Many years have passed since then, I probably forgot the terminology of the degree and remembered that it was called "software engineering".

However, not only do you deal with only one of the areas, but you also deal with a sub-area of ​​them. For example: Electrical Engineering is a general name for a wide range of professions, all of which require specialization, study and experience.

At the same time, I have seen cases of people who studied computer engineering and did conversion in the same company: from hardware to software.

In terms of level of difficulty: From what I have seen, most people have had difficulty with the physical courses or courses that required physical knowledge and understanding. If you feel comfortable with high level physics, it will probably be passable for you.

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I understood, thank you.

Is there a particular way I can actually understand what it means to study electricity? Mess with it a bit and see if I like it?

I do not feel like jumping into a degree that I'm not sure I like

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Of course there are, on university websites. Read here and you will get a pretty good idea of ​​what you are studying for a degree:

https://www.eng.tau.ac.il/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=72&Itemid=149&language=he-IL

You can enter any course and get more details.

By the way, the program is called "Computer Engineering and Software" so I was not really confused. You just insisted on attributing rigid concepts to these terms ...

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Beyond that: the fact that there are people who have studied computer science for 3 years and call themselves "engineers" does not really make them engineers.
So what makes them engineers? Intended of course for engineers תוכנה, Assuming you are at all aware of the existence of such a concept.
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I do not know what you mean by "software engineering", what educational institution it is, what you study there and whether they are recognized for the purpose of the Engineers' Register.

"Software engineering" can be just laundering words to attract students.

After all, in the example I gave earlier, from Tel Aviv University, the program is called "Computer Engineering and Software." In fact, it is a combination of electrical and electronics engineering with computer science.

Give me a link to a degree in Software Engineering so I can understand what this is all about.

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A degree is not just the knowledge acquired, it is far beyond that. A degree is a signal to potential employers about a person's skills and abilities. A degree in software engineering certainly indicates its owner more than a degree in computer science, as it is more difficult, cluttered and longer. 1. Another significant advantage of a software engineer is that such an engineer will be able to choose his path. He could be an engineer and he could be a programmer. The degree opens up more options, new doors. 2. A third advantage, if also limited, is for people who want to specialize in the field of real time embedded. Ostensibly, any programmer can do that, but an engineer has a certain advantage in that he is really able to understand how the hardware works. The downside: Harder and longer studies, which combine physics and engineering professions. Of course, the difficulty depends on the institution of study.

I do not know what La La Land you live in, but in the industry there is no difference between someone who studied a three-year degree in computer science and someone who studied a four-year degree in software engineering.

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If you want a matter-of-fact reference from me, do not use such disparaging language.

And for the record itself: I do not fully understand the distinction made here between computer engineering and software engineering. Only in the previous response did I show that it is a bit of an amorphous term. However, a computer engineer can engage in fields that anyone who has studied computer science usually does not come to engage in. For example, anything related to hardware development.

So if your experience comes from companies or software divisions, there probably will really be no difference. But in the hardware world there is a fundamental difference.

Edit: What I meant in paragraph 1 you quoted (which you probably disagree with), can be illustrated by the following simplistic case:

Two candidates for a particular position arrive. Both are qualified for the job and are identical in all parameters, except for one: one of them did a degree in computer science, the other did a degree in computer engineering. Who do you think will be elected?

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