Intel's new Extreme processors will only be available on 2016 • HWzone
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The new Intel Extreme processors will only come on 2016

The generation of the Broadwell-E processors,E in the high-end market, will be delayed and reach the stores only in more than a year

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intel-broadwell-e-x991
Proud presentation of the Broadwell-E processor (Source: vr-zone)

Broadwell's new Broadwell-E platform , Which will replace the existing Haswell-E processors to the high-end market, will reach us only at 2016, a significant delay than expected. The new processors based on Broadwell-E come with 14 nanometer technology, whereas compared to the current Hswell-E processors, there is no significant change in architecture. The new processors come with the X99 chipset , With six-to-eight-core option, 20 megabytes of L3-encapsulated memory, up to 40 PCI Express communication channels, and four-channel memory support With support up to 2,400 MHz.

With support from the Broadwell-E processors in the LGA 2011-v3 chassis , The company promises to back support at least a couple of boards with the X99-based chip set. The new Core i7 processor series is also expected to come with at least 140W power consumption, which compares the new platform to the current Haswell-E series, despite the use of 14's advanced nanometer technology .

The new generation of desktop processors , The Core M processors, introduces the second generation of the company's 14 nanometer technology, with a significant reduction in power consumption - which includes a reduction in system power at rest, in addition to the possibility of embedding the new series processors on fanless computers, not a small achievement . According to the company, you can expect about two processor performance compared to the company's core processor generation, and seven graphical performance, with support for natural 4K multimedia. The Broadwell Extreme Series will come with enhanced Iris Pro graphics , When the company still maintains close to the chest the performance tests for it.

With an 2016-coated launch for the new Extreme processor generation, the E-Brodwell processors will need to deliver Significant over the current generation of its processors to the high market to atone for the delay.


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30 תגובות

  1. Interestingly, the image states that the processor supports 4 memory channels, with each channel assigned one DIMM. This limits the amount of memory that the processor supports for 32GB in the current state (the largest volume DDR4 memory module currently is 8GB) or 64GB (if and when DDR4 memory modules have an 16GB volume). The Haswell-E processors currently support 64GB, which means 8 8GB modules and will probably also support 8GB 16GB modules, ie 128GB total memory.

    In any case, it's pretty pointless to talk about it right now, when the Haswell-E processors were recently released to the 2011-3.

  2. The picture is an example of course. There will be channel duplication similar to… every resident in the last two decades.
    Maximum memory size was and will remain 128GB.

  3. The picture is an example of course. Will duplicate channels similar to ... 

    Every resident in the last two decades.
    Maximum memory size was and will remain 128GB.
    Where exactly was 128GB?
    For desktop processors, the maximum amount of memory is 64GB, and this is in the 2011 socket, in this mainstream socket up to 32GB.
    Only xeon can work with a larger amount of memory

  4. Was and will remain 128GB on LGA2011-v3 of course. It is not going to change with BRD-E

  5. There was, and anyone who has access to early samples of 16GB for the stick can install 128GB.
    In 2015, the production process will be much wider and 16GB sticks will be available for purchase in stores.

  6. It does not matter how much each stick, which will be 32GB, the maximum amount of memory for a core series processor is up to 64GB, and a mainstream core processor such as 1155 or 1150 is up to 32GB.
    Even if you put 4 32GB STICKS the processor will work with 64GB only.

  7. But it is not, not in the LGA2011-v3 generation
    :)
    Come back here for a few more months with the single sticks of DDR4 non-ECC 16GB being launched and you'll see that building the Aswell-E-based 128GB system is possible for anyone who just wants to.

  8. I'll explain again, very slowly for the last time.
    No CORE processor physically supports more than 64GB memory, is not connected to any socket at all, is not related to how many slots or sticks there are. As the processor has a limit to PCIE channels, so it has a limit on memory. In the case of CORE processors, there is a limit of 64GB for high-end and 32GB mainstream processors.
    The 2011 Socket itself supports most memory, because it is also designed for XEON processors that support a much higher memory. But as long as sitting in the CORE Processor Socket will not support more than 64GB.

  9. I didn't understand why you were denying the facts on the ground. Want to complain that LGA2011-v3 processors support 128GB? You will come to Intel and memory manufacturers, not me. :) I only indicate information brought to me by them.

  10. I didn't understand why you were denying the facts on the ground. Want to complain that LGA2011-v3 processors support 128GB? You will come to Intel and memory manufacturers, not me. :) I just point out 

    Information brought to me by them.
    LOL
    I'm just trying to correct you when you say that the processors today support 128GB memory.
    If this is a fact in your opinion, I would love to see where it is written, or someone's computer with more than 64GB (or above 32GB in 1150)

  11. I signed up - anyone who works in the industry and has availability for early samples can use them. 16GB memories have not yet reached the stick for the general public, and this is expected to happen earlier this year with improved production processes and production lines opened. What's wrong with that?

  12. ] [RIGHT] [COLOR

    
    
    
    
    It is unnecessary to simply extort more money from people

    I have a friend who said this about the ddr3 and 2500K processors….

    And to Lior,
    Forget some people who just know everything ...: s07:

  13. Currently, Asrock and EVGA declare support for 128GB. Asus MSI and GB are also expected to join in the future.

    Once ASUS, MSI and EVGA start producing processors, then maybe. Meanwhile the processor itself does not support! A lot of 64GB's most supportive boards, like the Asus WS series, but it will only work with XEON and not when a "standard" processor is in the Socket.

  14. Okay, whatever you say. Seriously, why am I fighting windmills :). Wise for a few months and see for yourself.

  15. It's me fighting a windmill.
    A few more months, the same processors, with maximum support up to 64GB, will remain directly from the Intel site:

  16. ...
    And come back with you.
    The information listed there is valid at the time of launch, just as with the LGA1156 resident.

  17. Well, let's finish here.
    I'm talking about processors, you're talking about a resident again ...
    Today's processors will never support memory much, as they will no longer have PCIE channels nor will they grow new cores even if you wait another million years.

  18. So if I'm upgrading my old system to the new (existing one) - can I replace a processor in two years without replacing a board?
    And if so, what are the tablets that Intel will do well for the consumer as well as support them?

    Good news in my opinion.

  19. It's me fighting a windmill. For a few more months, the same processors, with maximum support up to 64GB, will remain directly from Intel website
    As djelectric said, this is the maximum at launch (otherwise it's a misdirected publication).
    
    See example

    .

  20. ] [RIGHT] [COLOR

    
    
    
    
    I'm talking about processors, you're talking about a ...

    You might just read what he writes.
    Existing processors also exist. Only in the future.

  21. A futile argument. What home user does 128GB need? Come on

    You'll be surprised.
    I will say I was very happy for at least 64GB.

  22. Well, let's finish here. I'm talking about processors, you're talking about a resident again ... Today's processors will never support the most memory, as they will no longer have PCIE channels nor will they grow new cores even if you wait another million years.
    I don't understand why you insist so: nixweiss: Take an example from a few years back. Formally according to Intel see here:
    
    http://ark.intel.com/products/47932/Intel-Core-i7-980X-Processor-Extreme-Edition-12M-Cache-3_33-GHz-6_40-GTs-Intel-QPI?q=Intel%C2%AE%20Core%E2%84%A2%20i7-980X%20Processor%20Extreme%20Edition%20(12M%20Cache,%203.33%20GHz,%206.40%20GT/s%20Intel%C2%AE%20QPI)
    But suddenly 8GB memory cards started to appear, installing such 6 on the boards gave 48GB even though Intel's site says "up to 24GB". You can see in these videos an example:
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    Now there is no such video of haswel e but someone who deals with hardware (just like the one in the video) tells you it exists in these processors as well. In other words, a video will be gone soon. So why are you going head to head ?!
  23. You haven't invested enough in your mobile, huh ?!

    Mobile now is just a base.
    Need another 12 fuck cores 64GB memory and a quadruple 980M-based quad and then I stand: D

    I opened a Max file of a very complex model (done on a serious stand) and have already reached 26GB occupied ... And if I want to perfect it?

  24. There are some here on the site who would like to exchange with you just to justify such a system… ..: smiley1:

  25. Trust me I enjoyed my three years of working with AW M11X.
    It really became a necessity.
    And when you have to.

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