Will Intel launch only a pair of stationary processors in its new Broadwell generation? • HWzone
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Will Intel launch only a pair of stationary processors in its new Broadwell generation?

Rumors have been circulating that the " The chip giant may include only two models with an LGA chassis for desktop computers. Wrong assessments or change in perception? Maybe it's a little of both

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The generation of the first 14 nanometer chips from Intel is already here with us, and also Showing capabilities and characteristics are not bad at all. But for performance enthusiasts, the main course is still on the way - the quad-core processors on a variety of models, And desktop processors in particular.

New reporting Gives us full technical details for two processors Desktops that are based on the LGA1150 (which is not one-time soldered to the motherboard) - but also claims that these may be the only two LGA processors seen in this generation.

The pair of models in question, the Core i7 5775C and the Core i5 5675C, offer a number of changes compared to most models we have seen in previous generations of - Both have a multiplication open for execution Simpler and more optimal, both offer the most powerful built-in graphics core that Chipsilla currently has to offer (the Iris Pro 6200), both with four physical cores (one with HyperThreading and the other without), and both are characterized by a relatively modest power envelope 65 watts.

In addition to the two LGA models in question, three R-based BGA-based R models are now also exposed - with impressive data
In addition to the two LGA models in question, three soldered BGA-based R models are now also unveiled - also with fairly impressive data. Source: vr-zone.com

Both models are seen as a refreshing breeze in the chip maker's desktop product line, but will they really be the only two in the LGwell-based LGA, apparently to To make room for the Skylake generation that is supposed to be launched later this year? hard to believe.

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Meanwhile it seems that Stands by what she declared earlier this year - but likely along the way we will see quite a few other desktop models from Broadwell

It is quite possible that in the initial launching class for the E- From the core quadrant (supposedly at the Compotex show this June) there will be a limited number of desktop models - but later, whether Will arrive on time or be delayed, it is very likely that we will see more and more models landing in stores as time goes on. After all, this is the fundamental fact of the chip world - not all products are of the same quality, some of them less quality and some are flawed - and the division into a variety of models with different capabilities and features allows any manufacturer in the semiconductor world to realize its revenue and profit potential.

Will work for a while longer until we can get a formal answer to this interesting wonder, and during this time we will focus on the positive side of the new information we receive here - lower power consumption, more powerful graphical cores than ever, and especially open-ended, self-respecting hardware enthusiasts.

Launch in about two months?
Launch in about two months?


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6 תגובות

  1. It makes sense that Intel will not release many processors from the Broadwell series to the home market for several reasons:
    A. Owners of the fourth generation (Haswell), and probably the third generation (Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge) will not bother to upgrade their processors to the fifth generation processors (Broadwell) because performance improvements are likely to be small in terms of expenditure, especially if you also need to replace them. Motherboard.
    B. The sixth generation (Skylake) processors are expected to come out a few months later and are expected to show performance improvement as this is a new architecture and will use faster DDR4 memory. So anyone who needs a new computer would probably rather wait for the Skylake processors than buy a computer based on the Broadwell processor, and those who need a new computer now and can't wait - it's better to buy a computer with a Haswell Refresh processor than wait for the Broadwell processors.
    third. Assuming that the Skylake processors, which should also be manufactured in the 14nm process, will be better than the Broadwell processors and assuming they are released a few months (maybe even 2-3 months) after the Broadwell processors, it is better for Intel to produce as many 14nm production lines Skylake approves Broadwell processors. Even if Skylake processor prices are the same as the Broadwell or Haswell processors they are meant to replace, Intel will benefit from them simply because a new motherboard with Intel chipset will be needed…

  2. Shay big you're right but you're talking about a very small market share of people who understand what they want from their computers and know what's going to happen tomorrow morning (more or less of course).

    An average person has no idea what Broadwell, Haswell, Skylake….
    He goes into the store (or online if he is technological) and asks for a computer. The seller tells him Buena heard I have a computer with Intel's fifth generation !!! The newest on the market now came out 10 minutes ago !!! (Or any other sales pitch)
    Do you think he knows the performance difference will be at 10% pressure? Do you think he already knows 3-4 generations (since the 2XXX series) Intel is improving at 10% max every time?
    Ordinary people do not speak at performance levels. They understand how long the computer "holds". He knows that his computer is X years old and from his point of view it is new / old (depending on the person's perception) so he may or may not want to replace it.
    It has nothing to do with Intel X generation or a new DDR or some sort of scramble that only we know what all those letters mean ...

  3. URL =
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    jackhammer
    Right, and it is likely that they will sell tens of thousands of Broadwell processors in the period between the release of the Broadwell processors and the release of the Skylake processors especially to people who have no idea of ​​the hardware. But if the article is correct (only a small number of models will be released, all of which have a multiplicity open) and the seller's store will be decent, he will tell the customer he'd better wait a few more months and then come back and buy a new (and practical - probably more expensive, at least monthly) - for the first two months until processor and board prices drop) or offer him a Haswell processor that offers quite similar performance but will be cheaper (processors that are usually more expensive than their non-multiples counterparts). Other potential customers who understand little or do not bother Checking out the issue would probably prefer not to buy a Broadwell processor (unless they are a planner Soon).

  4. How much money does a soldered processor save me compared to that "loose" processor?
    Will it be available to a private consumer?
    Are there any other benefits to BGA over LGA besides money?

  5. @
    
    

    jackhammer
    Right, and it is likely that they will sell tens of thousands of Broadwell processors in the period between the release of the Broadwell processors and the release of the Skylake processors especially to people who have no idea of ​​the hardware. But if the article is correct (only a small number of models will be released, all of which have a multiplicity open) and the seller's store will be decent, he will tell the customer he'd better wait a few more months and then come back and buy a new (and practical - probably more expensive, at least monthly) - for the first two months until processor and board prices drop) or offer him a Haswell processor that offers quite similar performance but will be cheaper (processors that are usually more expensive than their non-multiples counterparts). Other potential customers who understand little or do not bother Checking out the issue would probably prefer not to buy a Broadwell processor (unless they are a planner Soon).

    The keyword of this whole concept :)

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